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Microsoft Word crm-ptmt el Salvador 2009[final]. doc

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Workshop on Temporary Migrant Workers Programs

 

 

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maintained by OWWA which contains information on workers and their skills and competencies. The 

data base is linked to various chambers of commerce and industries for job placements and livelihood 

assistance, including outsourcing of jobs. This facilitates transfer of technology from the host country 

to the Philippines. 

Families of OFWs are also organized into associations for livelihood assistance. The 

involvement of the business groups, banks, and science and technology training centers on livelihood 

is necessary for an effective reintegration program. A special housing program for overseas workers is 

available at affordable terms. Scholarship programs are also available for deserving children of OFWs 

by schools and universities funded by the OWWA. Seed capital to start a business is also part of the 

benefit of an OWWA member. 

Addressing Irregular Migration 

An anti-illegal recruitment campaign program is in place and operates nation-wide, consisting 

of preventive and remedial components. The preventive aspect is a comprehensive and massive public 

information and education program using multi-media organizations, Church-groups, NGOs, local 

government units, schools and private entities are government partners in the program. On the 

remedial aspect, reports of illegal recruitment activities are immediately subject to surveillance and 

prosecution as criminal cases that are punishable by imprisonment and fine. By means of a joint police 

and civilian operative inquest fiscals are to attend these cases on a 24 hour basis. 

Based on different cases, irregular migration is facilitated by travel agencies and tour groups 

and even immigration consultants whose activities go beyond visa facilitation to cover a whole range 

of recruitment activities. To curtail their activities, their operation has been placed under the 

regulatory power of the POEA and they are required to secure a license just like with private 

recruitment activities. 

On June 2003, the Anti-trafficking Act was passed, which defines the acts penalized and 

provides stiffer penalty for violations. Currently, acts and violations of this kind are no longer 

prosecuted as illegal recruitment cases as they were before. Our experience shows that effective 

collaboration with labor departments and intelligence agencies of various countries is most necessary 

for both the preventive and remedial approach to illegal recruitment and trafficking cases. 

C. Migration as a Development Strategy  

The presence of more than 8 million Filipino workers in over 190 countries has contributed to the 

development of economic and social goals of the country. OFW remittances continue to support the 

Philippine economy with much-needed revenues. In 2008, remittances amounted to about US$14 

Billion. Such remittances come from workers in occupations such as health workers, nurses, 

caregivers and performing artists.   

Migration of Filipino workers significantly contributes to the social development and an 

improved quality of life in our country. A World Bank study noted that a family member working 

abroad can enable his or her family cross the poverty line as remittances are spent on better or higher 

education, food, and housing.  

Migrant communities abroad are also very active in mobilizing resources for social 

development initiatives like the construction of classrooms in schools, providing better access for groups 

to become engaged in business, education and rural development. The migration of Filipino workers 

facilitates the formation of human capital in the country, since most remittances are invested in education 

and the Filipino migrants themselves act as sponges for the latest technology and competitive business 

management methods. As they work, OFWs become valuable sources of innovation and expertise, 

becoming forces of change when they visit, do business or return home. The Philippines’ Brain Gain 

Network, for instance, has facilitated the creation of companies in the Philippines by providing 

consultancy services to Filipino corporations, government agencies and the academe, and helped in the 

establishment of branches of foreign investments or companies in the country.  



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